Top

Blocking differentiation is enough to give cells ‘stemness’

October 23, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Though immune therapy and regenerative medicine are promising areas of research for future medical therapies, they are limited today by the difficulty of creating stem cells, and scientists around the world are searching for ways to create somatic stem cells in the easiest way possible. Now, a collaboration between the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science (IMS) and other institutions in Japan and Europe have found that in immune cells, simply blocking a transcription factor that leads to differentiation is sufficient to keep cells in a multipotent stem cell-like state where they can continue to proliferate and can later differentiate into various cell types.

Read more

Scientists sequence genome of worm that can regrow body parts, seeking stem cell insights

September 22, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Tourists spending a recuperative holiday on the Italian coast may be envious of the regenerative abilities of locally found flatworm Macrostomum lignano. Named for its discovery near the Italian beach town of Lignano Sabbiadoro, this tiny worm can regenerate almost its whole body following an injury, and researchers have long been trying to understand how it’s able to pull off this trick.

Read more

New way to repair nerves: Using exosomes to hijack cell-to-cell communication

September 15, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Regenerative medicine using stem cells is an increasingly promising approach to treat many types of injury. Transplanted stem cells can differentiate into just about any other kind of cell, including neurons to potentially reconnect a severed spinal cord and repair paralysis.

Read more

Variations in cell programs control cancer and normal stem cells

September 3, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

In the breast, cancer stem cells and normal stem cells can arise from different cell types but tap into distinct yet related stem cell programs, according to Whitehead Institute researchers. The differences between these stem cell programs may be significant enough to be exploited by future therapeutics.

Read more

Stem cells help researchers study the effects of pollution on human health

August 10, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

A recent study published in the Journal of Environmental Sciences (JES) shows that embryonic stem cells could serve as a model to evaluate the physiological effects of environmental pollutants efficiently and cost-effectively.

Read more

New measurements reveal differences between stem cells for treating retinal degeneration

July 3, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

By growing two types of stem cells in a “3-D culture” and measuring their ability to produce retinal cells, a team lead by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital researchers has found one cell type to be better at producing retinal cells.

Read more

RegMedNet shines light on use of stem cells as a potential Huntington’s disease treatment

April 26, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG triplet expansion in the Huntington gene, which causes progressive neuropsychiatric and motor dysfunction and leads to death. There is currently no cure for HD – treatment is strictly palliative.

Read more

NASA and STScI Select Hubble Fellows for 2015

April 6, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Read more

Super-resolution microscopes reveal the link between genome packaging and cell pluripotency

March 13, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

In 1953 Watson and Crick first published the discovery of the double helix structure of the DNA. They were able to visualize the DNA structure by means of X-Ray diffraction. Techniques, such as electron microscopy, allowed scientists to identify nucleosomes, the first and most basic level of chromosome organisation. Until now it was known that our DNA is packaged by regular repeating units of those nucleosomes throughout the genome giving rise to chromatin. However, due to the lack of suitable techniques and instruments, the chromatin organisation inside a cell nucleus could not be observed in a non-invasive way with the sufficient resolution. Now, for the first time, a group of scientists at the CRG and ICFO in Barcelona, have been able to visualise and even count the smallest units which, packaged together, form our genome. This study was possible thanks to the use of super-resolution microscopy, a new cutting-edge optical technique that received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2014. In combination with innovative quantitative approaches and numerical simulations, they were also able to define the genome architecture at the nano-scale. Most importantly, they found that the nucleosomes are assembled in irregular groups across the chromatin and nucleosome-free-DNA regions separate these groups.

Read more

Wisdom teeth stem cells can transform into cells that could treat corneal scarring

February 23, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Stem cells from the dental pulp of wisdom teeth can be coaxed to turn into cells of the eye’s cornea and could one day be used to repair corneal scarring due to infection or injury, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings, published online today inĀ STEM CELLS Translational Medicine, indicate they also could become a new source of corneal transplant tissue made from the patient’s own cells.

Read more

Next Page »

Bottom