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Researchers advance the science behind treating patients with corneal blindness

January 29, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Researchers in the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute have devised a novel way to generate transplantable corneal stem cells that may eventually benefit patients suffering from life-altering forms of blindness.

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Researchers recreate stem cells from deceased patients to study present-day illnesses

December 2, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Research scientists have developed a novel method to re-create brain and intestinal stem cells from patients who died decades ago, using DNA from stored blood samples to study the potential causes of debilitating illnesses such as inflammatory bowel disease.

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Lou Gehrig’s disease: From patient stem cells to potential treatment strategy in one study

October 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Although the technology has existed for just a few years, scientists increasingly use “disease in a dish” models to study genetic, molecular and cellular defects. But a team of doctors and scientists led by researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute went further in a study of Lou Gehrig’s disease, a fatal disorder that attacks muscle-controlling nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord.

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Salk scientists discover more versatile approach to creating stem cells

July 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Stem cells are key to the promise of regenerative medicine: the repair or replacement of injured tissues with custom grown substitutes. Essential to this process are induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which can be created from a patient’s own tissues, thus eliminating the risk of immune rejection. However, Shinya Yamanaka’s formula for iPSCs, for which he was awarded last year’s Nobel Prize, uses a strict recipe that allows for limited variations in human cells, restricting their full potential for clinical application.

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Method makes it easier to separate useful stem cells from ‘problem’ ones for therapies

April 23, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Pluripotent stem cells can turn, or differentiate, into any cell type in the body, such as nerve, muscle or bone, but inevitably some of these stem cells fail to differentiate and end up mixed in with their newly differentiated daughter cells.

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Research supports promise of stem cell therapy for bowel disease

February 28, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and colleagues have identified a special population of adult stem cells in bone marrow that have the natural ability to migrate to the intestine and produce intestinal cells, suggesting their potential to restore healthy tissue in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

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Researchers find multiple similarities between cancer cells and induced pluripotent stem cells

September 30, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

UC Davis investigators have found new evidence that a promising type of stem cell now being considered for a variety of disease therapies is very similar to the type of cells that give rise to cancer. The findings suggest that although the cells — known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) — show substantial promise as a source of replacement cells and tissues to treat injuries, disease and chronic conditions, scientists and physicians must move cautiously with any clinical use because iPSCs could also cause malignant cancer.

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Embryonic blood vessels that make blood stem cells can also make beating heart muscles

August 2, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

UCLA stem cell researchers have found for the first time a surprising and unexpected plasticity in the embryonic endothelium, the place where blood stem cells are made in early development.

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Cedars-Sinai researchers, with stem cells, advance understanding of spinal muscular atrophy

June 20, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Cedars-Sinai’s Regenerative Medicine Institute has pioneered research on how motor-neuron cell-death occurs in patients with spinal muscular atrophy, offering an important clue in identifying potential medicines to treat this leading genetic cause of death in infants and toddlers.

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A better way to grow bone: Fresh, purified fat stem cells grow bone faster and better

June 11, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

UCLA stem cell scientists purified a subset of stem cells found in fat tissue and made from them bone that was formed faster and was of higher quality than bone grown using traditional methods, a finding that may one day eliminate the need for painful bone grafts that use material taken from the patient during invasive procedures.

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