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U-M researchers find new gene involved in blood-forming stem cells

April 16, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Research led by the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute has identified a gene critical to controlling the body’s ability to create blood cells and immune cells from blood-forming stem cells–known as hematopoietic stem cells.

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Test predicts response to treatment for complication of leukemia stem cell treatment

December 23, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

A new test may reveal which patients will respond to treatment for graft versus host disease (GVHD), an often life-threatening complication of stem cell transplants (SCT) used to treat leukemia and other blood disorders, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online today in the journal Lancet Haematology and in print in the January issue.

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Lab-developed intestinal organoids form mature human tissue in mice

October 19, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Researchers have successfully transplanted “organoids” of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice – creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine.

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Discovery may make it easier to develop life-saving stem cells

July 17, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Not unlike looking for the proverbial needle in a haystack, a team of Michigan State University researchers have found a gene that could be key to the development of stem cells – cells that can potentially save millions of lives by morphing into practically any cell in the body.

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Spinal cord mass arising from neural stem cell therapy

July 8, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

A spinal mass was identified in a young woman with complete spinal cord injury 8 years after she had undergone implantation of olfactory mucosal cells in the hopes of regaining sensory and motor function. The case is reported and discussed in “Autograft-derived spinal cord mass following olfactory mucosal cell transplantation in a spinal cord injury patient. Case report,” by Brian J. Dlouhy, MD, Olatilewa Awe, MD, Rajesh C. Rao, MD, Patricia A. Kirby, MD, and Patrick W. Hitchon, MD, published today online, ahead of print, in theJournal of Neurosurgery: Spine. The authors state that this is the first report of a spinal cord mass arising from spinal cord cell transplantation and neural stem cell therapy, and they caution that physicians should be vigilant in their follow-up of patients who undergo stem cell interventions.

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First stem cell study of bipolar disorder yields promising results

March 26, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

What makes a person bipolar, prone to manic highs and deep, depressed lows? Why does bipolar disorder run so strongly in families, even though no single gene is to blame? And why is it so hard to find new treatments for a condition that affects 200 million people worldwide?

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New finding points to potential options for attacking stem cells in triple-negative breast cancer

February 20, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

New research from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and Georgia Regents University finds that a protein that fuels an inflammatory pathway does not turn off in breast cancer, resulting in an increase in cancer stem cells. This provides a potential target for treating triple negative breast cancer, the most aggressive form of the disease.

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Scientists identify biomarker to predict immune response risk after stem cell transplants

August 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Researchers from Indiana University, the University of Michigan, the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have identified and validated a biomarker accessible in blood tests that could be used to predict which stem cell transplant patients are at highest risk for a potentially fatal immune response called graft-versus-host disease.

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Divide and define: Clues to understanding how stem cells produce different kinds of cells

May 6, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

The human body contains trillions of cells, all derived from a single cell, or zygote, made by the fusion of an egg and a sperm. That single cell contains all the genetic information needed to develop into a human, and passes identical copies of that information to each new cell as it divides into the many diverse types of cells that make up a complex organism like a human being.

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Spring cleaning in your brain: New stem cell research shows how important it is

April 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

 

Deep inside your brain, a legion of stem cells lies ready to turn into new brain and nerve cells whenever and wherever you need them most. While they wait, they keep themselves in a state of perpetual readiness – poised to become any type of nerve cell you might need as your cells age or get damaged.

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