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Sleep deprivation affects stem cells, reducing transplant efficiency, study finds

October 14, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Drowsy mice make poor stem cell donors, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Study provides hope for some human stem cell therapies

August 21, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

An international team of scientists headed by biologists at UC San Diego has discovered that an important class of stem cells known as human “induced pluripotent stem cells,” or iPSCs, which are derived from an individual’s own cells, can be differentiated into various types of functional cells with different fates of immune rejection.

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US clinics avoiding government oversight of ‘stem cell’ treatments

May 3, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Clinics across the United States are advertising stem cell treatments that attempt to take advantage of what they perceive as exceptions in FDA regulations, according to bioethicist Leigh G. Turner, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Minnesota Center for Bioethics and School of Public Health.

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Prenatal stem cell treatment improves mobility issues caused by spina bifida

April 30, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

The lower-limb paralysis associated with spina bifida may be effectively treated before birth by combining a unique stem cell therapy with surgery, new research from UC Davis Health System has found.

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‘Open’ stem cell chromosomes reveal new possibilities for diabetes

April 3, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Stem cells hold great promise for treating a number of diseases, in part because they have the unique ability to differentiate, specializing into any one of the hundreds of cell types that comprise the human body. Harnessing this potential, though, is difficult. In some cases, it takes up to seven carefully orchestrated steps of adding certain growth factors at specific times to coax stem cells into the desired cell type. Even then, cells of the intestine, liver and pancreas are notoriously difficult to produce from stem cells. Writing in Cell Stem Cell April 2, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered why.

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New study shows safer methods for stem cell culturing

February 26, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

A new study led by researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the University of California (UC), San Diego School of Medicine shows that certain stem cell culture methods are associated with increased DNA mutations. The study points researchers toward safer and more robust methods of growing stem cells to treat disease and injury.

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State funding boosts stem cell research in California, other states

February 19, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

When federal funding regulations created limitations on human embryonic stem cell research, several states created their own funding programs. A new study analyzed stem cell funding programs in four states that provided their own funding and found that in both California and Connecticut, state programs have contributed to an increase in the share of publications in the field produced in these states.

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Engineers put the ‘squeeze’ on human stem cells

February 11, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

After using optical tweezers to squeeze a tiny bead attached to the outside of a human stem cell, researchers now know how mechanical forces can trigger a key signaling pathway in the cells.

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Stem cell transplantation shows potential for reducing disability in patients with MS

January 21, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Results from a preliminary study indicate that among patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), treatment with nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (low intensity stem cell transplantation) was associated with improvement in measures of disability and quality of life, according to a study in the January 20 issue of JAMA.

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Nail stem cells prove more versatile than press ons

November 21, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

There are plenty of body parts that don’t grow back when you lose them. Nails are an exception, and a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) reveals some of the reasons why.

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