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Pancreatic cancer stem cells could be ‘suffocated’ by an anti-diabetic drug

September 11, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Cancer cells commonly rely on glycolysis, the type of metabolism that does not use oxygen to generate their energy however, researchers from Queen Mary University of London’s Barts Cancer Institute and the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) in Madrid have now found that not all cancer cells are alike when it comes to metabolism.

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Discovery offers hope for treating leukemia relapse post-transplant

September 11, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Targeting exhausted immune cells may change the prognosis for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse after a stem cell transplant, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

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Researchers mimic viral infection in colon cancer stem cells

August 27, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Researchers targeting colorectal cancer stem cells – the root cause of disease, resistance to treatment and relapse – have discovered a mechanism to mimic a virus and potentially trigger an immune response to fight the cancer like an infection.

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Stem cells help researchers study the effects of pollution on human health

August 10, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

A recent study published in the Journal of Environmental Sciences (JES) shows that embryonic stem cells could serve as a model to evaluate the physiological effects of environmental pollutants efficiently and cost-effectively.

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Blood stem cells in a rush — velocity determines quality

July 11, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

For the first time, the research group of Prof. Claudia Waskow at the Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine at Dresden Technical University is now describing a new mechanism in which the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle has a dramatic impact on the fitness of human blood stem cells. In the study, the shortened G1 phase resulted in much improved continuous production of mature blood cells from stem cells over a prolonged period of time. It is imaginable that the stem cell function can also be increased in the human body in the future by an acceleration of cell cycle transition kinetic. The work has now been published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine(DOI:10.1084/jem.20150308).

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Circadian rhythms regulate skin stem cell metabolism and expansion, UCI study finds

January 8, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

UC Irvine scientists studying the role of circadian rhythms in skin stem cells found that this clock plays a key role in coordinating daily metabolic cycles and cell division.

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University of Toronto cell biologists discover on-off switch for key stem cell gene

December 15, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Consider the relationship between an air traffic controller and a pilot. The pilot gets the passengers to their destination, but the air traffic controller decides when the plane can take off and when it must wait. The same relationship plays out at the cellular level in animals, including humans. A region of an animal’s genome – the controller – directs when a particular gene – the pilot – can perform its prescribed function.

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Delivering stem cells into heart muscle may enhance cardiac repair and reverse injury

November 20, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Delivering stem cell factor directly into damaged heart muscle after a heart attack may help repair and regenerate injured tissue, according to a study led by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai presented November 18 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL.

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Rutgers Chemistry’s Ki-Bum Lee patents technology to advance stem cell therapeutics

November 13, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Rutgers University Chemistry Associate Professor Ki-Bum Lee has developed patent-pending technology that may overcome one of the critical barriers to harnessing the full therapeutic potential of stem cells.

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Stanford scientists use stem cells to learn how common mutation in Asians affects heart health

September 26, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Over 500 million people worldwide carry a genetic mutation that disables a common metabolic protein called ALDH2. The mutation, which predominantly occurs in people of East Asian descent, leads to an increased risk of heart disease and poorer outcomes after a heart attack. It also causes facial flushing when carriers drink alcohol.

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